Espresso-based coffee has a variety of possible presentations. In its most basic form, an espresso is served alone as a shot or short black, or with hot water added, when it is known as Caffè Americano. A long black is made by pouring a double espresso into an equal portion of water, retaining the crema, unlike Caffè Americano.[113] Milk is added in various forms to an espresso: steamed milk makes a caffè latte,[114] equal parts steamed milk and milk froth make a cappuccino,[113] and a dollop of hot foamed milk on top creates a caffè macchiato.[115] A flat white is prepared by adding steamed hot milk (microfoam) to espresso so that the flavour is brought out and the texture is unusually velvety.[116][117] It has less milk than a latte but both are varieties of coffee to which the milk can be added in such a way as to create a decorative surface pattern. Such effects are known as latte art. 

Mid-century modern refers to furniture created in the mid-1900s. It’s extremely popular today and for good reason: its natural, clean lines and use of organic and engineered ingredients are beautiful, comfortable, and very versatile. Mid-century modern pieces include iconic designs such as the tulip table, with its futuristic swoops and classic white color, the Eames Lounge Chair, knocked off constantly and even featured in sitcoms like Frasier, and the Womb Chair, also designed by Eero Saarinen because “more than ever before, we need to relax.”
Trying to decide between keeping a space cool and well-lit? With a ceiling fan like this, there's no need to choose! Perfect for a modern look in any ensemble, this piece features two fan blades crafted from clear acrylic glass that feature a curving design. For an added bright touch, this piece includes an integrated LED behind a frosted glass shade. Designed to keep larger spaces cool, this piece features six speeds, and includes a remote control.
Now we have all the hardware implemented we can start looking at software. I downloaded and installed software called Glediator to create animations for the LEDs (http://www.solderlab.de/index.php/software/glediat...). The installation instructions can be a bit fiddly but follow the website closely and you should be fine. We also need to download the sketch from the Glediator website to upload to the Arduino (http://www.solderlab.de/index.php/downloads/catego...). We are using WS2812B LEDs so make sure you download the right one (WS2812 Glediator Interface). Once you open this sketch, change the NUMBER_OF_PIXELS to 144 and upload it to the Arduino.
This is really great. It’s got my vote. And thanks for giving cred to Greg Klassen’s excellent work. I'll definitely be trying something like this out. Hopefully it's obvious to folks that those C-channel braces underneath are critical, and that plate glass should probably not be be used as a structural component (despite my doing things like this... - but hey, its 3/4":)
Similar to the round table, the oval glass coffee table is great for rooms that are short on space. If you are looking for a table gives a room more structure an oval glass coffee table is great for this purpose. Opposed to a round table that has no clear side the oval table clearly has a long and short side which helps dictate what should be put where which gives the room structure.

I live in a small city apartment, so I didn't even think I could put a desk in my space. This desk is perfect. It is not tiny; it actually is quite roomy, but it's minimalist design makes it appear to take up far less real estate in a room. The glass top gives it an even airier feel. I place a couple of inexpensive clear drawer inserts (bought on Amazon) in the large shelf, and it is now very functional.


Possession of tableware has to a large extent been determined by individual wealth; the greater the means, the higher was the quality of tableware that was owned and the more numerous its pieces. In the London of the 13th century, the more affluent citizens owned fine furniture and silver, "while those of straiter means possessed only the simplest pottery and kitchen utensils." By the later 16th century, "even the poorer citizens dined off pewter rather than wood" and had plate, jars and pots made from "green glazed earthenware".[5] The nobility often used their arms on heraldic china.
The Signature Design By Ashley Marion Brown Cocktail Table with 4 Stools comes with everything you need for an updated seating solution. The birch veneer and hardwood solid frame of these piece ensure lasting durability throughout the years. Made with a clear beveled float glass insert, the cocktail table captures contemporary styling perfectly. Four matching stools are included and provide comfortable seating for you and yours with the help of the upholstered medium brown faux leather seats. A complementing dark brown finish washes over this piece creating a warm, rustic ...

The sleek living room of a Manhattan apartment designed by Jamie Drake and Caleb Anderson of Drake/Anderson has two separate sitting areas and tables of various sizes throughout. The glass cocktail table by Fredrikson Stallard is filled with feathers, the round side table is by Holly Hunt Studio, the lamp on it is by Charles Paris and the custom rug is by Tai Ping.

Anchor your seating ensemble in sleek and chic style with this ultramodern coffee table. Distinctively designed, this piece features a wide body with a curved lower panel, while a trestle base provides stylish support. Four partitioned cubby shelves set under a pane of tempered glass offer organized storage for everything from remotes to coasters to board games and more, while two side drawers are great for stowing batteries and matchbooks. Crafted of manufactured wood with glossy veneers, this...


Solid and sturdy, wood tables can easily hold stacks of books, intricate vignettes, tired feet, and food and drinks. But before you kick back with the movie snacks, be sure to treat your table right—wood tables should be sealed to prevent stains, scratches, and discoloration. If your budget permits, opt for a style with inlaid polished stone; it’s virtually stain and scratch-proof.
Clean lines and clever storage features make the Sauder Cottage Road Lift Top Coffee Table a modern essential for any multifunctioning living room. It's crafted with a engineered wood frame finished in crisp dual tones: a white base with a lintel oak top. One side of the top lifts to reveal storage space, and the other side has a clear glass insert that displays items stored in the pullout drawer below. An open shelf along the length of the base is perfect for books and collectibles.
Pembroke tables were first introduced during the 18th century and were popular throughout the 19th century. Their main characteristic was a rectangular or oval top with folding or drop leaves on each side. Most examples have one or more drawers and four legs sometimes connected by stretchers. Their design meant they could easily be stored or moved about and conveniently opened for serving tea, dining, writing, or other occasional uses.
But wait! This is a water-based finish, and walnut grain has a tendency to raise up when it becomes moist. So apply a fine mist of water to the wood surfaces you want to finish with a spray bottle. Wait 15 minutes and feel the wood. Chances are it won't feel smooth anymore. The wood grain became moist, expanded, and raised up out of the surface. If you sand the surface again now, you'll sand off the grain that raised up, and there shouldn't be any more grain to raise up when the wood gets wet! To be safe, wait until the wood dries, and repeat this process. There shouldn't be much grain which rises up, and the surface should be smooth after this step.
The earliest credible evidence of coffee-drinking appears in modern-day Yemen in southern Arabia in the middle of the 15th century in Sufi shrines.[6] It was here in Arabia that coffee seeds were first roasted and brewed in a manner similar to how it is now prepared. But the coffee seeds had to be first exported from East Africa to Yemen, as Coffea arabica is thought to have been indigenous to the former.[7] The Yemenis obtained their coffee via Somali traders from Berbera (who in turn procured the beans from the Ethiopian Highlands) and began to cultivate the seed. By the 16th century, the drink had reached Persia, Turkey, and North Africa. From there, it spread to Europe and the rest of the world. 

A mattress, a few items under $200. Other respondents received some items from their families: One woman, age 27, “inherited a lot of furniture on its last legs (old chairs, a twin-sized futon chair, my childhood bedroom set)” and “slowly built up the rest from Ikea and scrounging around”; a 26-year-old woman who first moved to Madison, Wisconsin, said, “I bought a big dresser with a mirror at a garage sale, dug my childhood desk out of my parents’ house, bought an Ikea couch and Target coffee table, and set up a kitchen table I was handed down from my cousin.”
Rattan also called Wicker is a good choice for patio furniture. They are also preferred for home furniture for their tranquility feature. The upper part of the tables smooth, making it easy to place things over the table without toppling. The color shades of the wicker make the furniture look unique from rest of the other stuff. Mostly rattan tables are found in gazebos or in open lounges.
I was born in 1981, which places me on the far end of what marketers call “old millennials” — and particularly poised to observe just how effectively the furniture revolution has transformed my life and the lives of other (middle-class) millennials. I graduated from college in 2003 and spent the next decade moving all over the place: Over my graduate career and following attempts to secure a job, I moved to Seattle, Oregon, Texas, Vermont, and back to eastern Washington state before ending up in New York.
Meanwhile, coffee had been introduced to Brazil in 1727, although its cultivation did not gather momentum until independence in 1822.[38] After this time massive tracts of rainforest were cleared for coffee plantations, first in the vicinity of Rio de Janeiro and later São Paulo.[39] Brazil went from having essentially no coffee exports in 1800, to being a significant regional producer in 1830, to being the largest producer in the world by 1852. In 1910–20, Brazil exported around 70% of the world's coffee, Colombia, Guatemala, and Venezuela, exported half of the remaining 30%, and Old World production accounted for less than 5% of world exports.[40]

An Asian coffee known as kopi luwak undergoes a peculiar process made from coffee berries eaten by the Asian palm civet, passing through its digestive tract, with the beans eventually harvested from feces. Coffee brewed from this process[89] is among the most expensive in the world, with bean prices reaching $160 per pound[90] or $30 per brewed cup.[91] Kopi luwak coffee is said to have uniquely rich, slightly smoky aroma and flavor with hints of chocolate, resulting from the action of digestive enzymes breaking down bean proteins to facilitate partial fermentation.[89][91]
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