The American coffeehouse chain Starbucks, which began as a modest business roasting and selling coffee beans in 1971, was founded by three college students, Jerry Baldwin, Gordon Bowker, and Zev Siegl. The first store opened on March 30, 1971 at the Pike Place Market in Seattle, followed by a second and third over the next two years.[198] Entrepreneur Howard Schultz joined the company in 1982 as Director of Retail Operations and Marketing, and pushed to sell premade espresso coffee. The others were reluctant, but Schultz opened Il Giornale in Seattle in April 1986.[199] He bought the other owners out in March 1987 and pushed on with plans to expand—from 1987 to the end of 1991, the chain (rebranded from Il Giornale to Starbucks) expanded to over 100 outlets.[200] The company has 25,000 stores in over 75 countries worldwide.[201]
The whole saga is instructive. Pieces like Hezel’s travel swiftly through social networks because they express something theretofore inexpressible, something that many had felt, but lacked the narrative or the gumption to express: namely, that the promise of West Elm furniture — that its purchase was a passkey to adulthood — was false. Or true, but only if you consider “adulthood” as “the everyday reality of getting quietly manipulated by brands and marketers.” West Elm furniture is nicer than most Ikea stuff, but it is not that well-made. My West Elm couch is pilling. My dresser never really closes right. If you own something from West Elm, there’s probably something wrong with it, too. It is not your forever furniture.
This minimalist mirror features a flat panel of glass in a sleek brushed nickel frame and can be wall-mounted or leaned. For a contemporary ensemble in your bedroom, start by rolling out a white shag area rug to define the space, then arrange a lacquered wood nightstand with chrome legs on each side of a low-profile platform bed. Lean this streamlined mirror against the wall outside your closet, then add bold accents to brighten up space, including a potted fiddle leaf fig plant in a textured...
Espresso-based coffee has a variety of possible presentations. In its most basic form, an espresso is served alone as a shot or short black, or with hot water added, when it is known as Caffè Americano. A long black is made by pouring a double espresso into an equal portion of water, retaining the crema, unlike Caffè Americano.[113] Milk is added in various forms to an espresso: steamed milk makes a caffè latte,[114] equal parts steamed milk and milk froth make a cappuccino,[113] and a dollop of hot foamed milk on top creates a caffè macchiato.[115] A flat white is prepared by adding steamed hot milk (microfoam) to espresso so that the flavour is brought out and the texture is unusually velvety.[116][117] It has less milk than a latte but both are varieties of coffee to which the milk can be added in such a way as to create a decorative surface pattern. Such effects are known as latte art.
Glass thicknesses are shown as a Nominal Thickness, meaning “in name only”, used solely for identification. These are commonly listed as 1/8″, 5/32″, 1/8″, 3/16″, 1/4″, 3/8″, and 1/2″. The nominal size may not match the exact thickness but will be within the acceptable industry-wide thickness range and can correspond to a large number of highly standardized dimensions and tolerances.
The coffee break originated in the late 19th century in Stoughton, Wisconsin, with the wives of Norwegian immigrants. The city celebrates this every year with the Stoughton Coffee Break Festival.[204] In 1951, Time noted that "[s]ince the war, the coffee break has been written into union contracts".[205] The term subsequently became popular through a Pan-American Coffee Bureau ad campaign of 1952 which urged consumers, "Give yourself a Coffee-Break – and Get What Coffee Gives to You."[206] John B. Watson, a behavioral psychologist who worked with Maxwell House later in his career, helped to popularize coffee breaks within the American culture.[207] Coffee breaks usually last from 10 to 20 minutes and frequently occur at the end of the first third of the work shift. In some companies and some civil service, the coffee break may be observed formally at a set hour. In some places, a cart with hot and cold beverages and cakes, breads and pastries arrives at the same time morning and afternoon, an employer may contract with an outside caterer for daily service, or coffee breaks may take place away from the actual work-area in a designated cafeteria or tea room. More generally, the phrase "coffee break" has also come to denote any break from work.
According to legend, ancestors of today's Oromo people in a region of Kaffa in Ethiopia were believed to have been the first to recognize the energizing effect of the coffee plant.[6] However, there is no direct evidence that has been found earlier than the 15th century indicating where in Africa coffee first grew or who among the native populations might have used it as a stimulant.[6] The story of Kaldi, the 9th-century Ethiopian goatherd who discovered coffee when he noticed how excited his goats became after eating the beans from a coffee plant, did not appear in writing until 1671 and is probably apocryphal.[6]

Set an abstract foundation for your stylish space with this blue and white area rug, showcasing a marbled, paint-spill motif. Machine made in Turkey, this area rug is power loomed of stain- and fade-resistant polypropylene in a medium 0.5" pile – perfect for rolling out in fashionable living rooms and dining spaces prone to the occasional spills and stains alike. Easily vacuumed or spot cleaned for effortless upkeep, this rug performs best when paired with a rug pad to prevent shifting and... https://www.pier1.com
×