Undeniably the most common shape for any kind of table, you can’t go wrong with four sides and four corners! Rectangular tables are often better fits for long, narrow places and in fact, can make themselves smaller than round tables and yet still cover a lot of ground. Whether you’re hosting a holiday meal for a crowd or fitting a work table into an unused closet, rectangles can fit the bill perfectly. www.structube.com
Possession of tableware has to a large extent been determined by individual wealth; the greater the means, the higher was the quality of tableware that was owned and the more numerous its pieces. In the London of the 13th century, the more affluent citizens owned fine furniture and silver, "while those of straiter means possessed only the simplest pottery and kitchen utensils." By the later 16th century, "even the poorer citizens dined off pewter rather than wood" and had plate, jars and pots made from "green glazed earthenware".[5] The nobility often used their arms on heraldic china.
The concept of fair trade labeling, which guarantees coffee growers a negotiated preharvest price, began in the late 1980s with the Max Havelaar Foundation's labeling program in the Netherlands. In 2004, 24,222 metric tons (of 7,050,000 produced worldwide) were fair trade; in 2005, 33,991 metric tons out of 6,685,000 were fair trade, an increase from 0.34% to 0.51%.[217][218] A number of fair trade impact studies have shown that fair trade coffee produces a mixed impact on the communities that grow it. Many studies are skeptical about fair trade, reporting that it often worsens the bargaining power of those who are not part of it. Coffee was incorporated into the fair-trade movement in 1988, when the Max Havelaar mark was introduced in the Netherlands. The very first fair-trade coffee was an effort to import a Guatemalan coffee into Europe as "Indio Solidarity Coffee".[219]
When coffee reached North America during the Colonial period, it was initially not as successful as it had been in Europe as alcoholic beverages remained more popular. During the Revolutionary War, the demand for coffee increased so much that dealers had to hoard their scarce supplies and raise prices dramatically; this was also due to the reduced availability of tea from British merchants,[31] and a general resolution among many Americans to avoid drinking tea following the 1773 Boston Tea Party.[32] After the War of 1812, during which Britain temporarily cut off access to tea imports, the Americans' taste for coffee grew.
Central to your living ensemble, a good coffee table is almost as good as your favorite morning mug (almost). So whether you're looking to clear away living room clutter, or just keep the remote in easy reach, a coffee table like this is a handy touch. Crafted from a black-finished iron frame, this piece features a tempered glass surface and sides for a terrarium-inspired look. And with a two-door compartment, you can create an on-trend display (and even house plants) inside this piece for an...

Working isn't always wonderful, but that doesn't mean your study can't be stylish! Elevate that office ensemble and you might just find yourself putting in overtime without even thinking. Start by setting the tone and adding a stunning seat with this distinctive desk chair, a true modern marvel. Wrapped in animal-friendly faux leather upholstery with a ribbed design and a neutral solid hue, it forms to your back on its own and offers a versatile stage for a colorfully patterned pillow. Plus... www.wish.com/‎
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