A sleek addition to the kitchen island or breakfast bar, this stool lends your space eye-catching style as it creates a place for your guests to kick back. Crafted from metal, it stands atop a pedestal-style base with an adjustable height and swivels functionality, so you can find the perfect angle every time. A low-backed saddle seat wrapped in faux leather completes the look as it offers you and your guests.
Anchor your seating ensemble in glamorous, modern style with this geometric coffee table. Crafted of metal in a gleaming chrome finish, this coffee table strikes a hexagonal silhouette on an open trellis base. Up top, a frosted glass tabletop provides an elegant, yet easy-to-clean stage for everything from flowers and books, to appetizers and drinks at your next get-together with friends. Measures 18.75" H x 40" W x 34.5" D overall.
She wanted something more traditional.  I started by looking for a reasonably priced table leg.  The one I found was from Van Dyke’s Restorers.  They have tons of shapes and sizes.   It was on sale, around $16 each plus some shipping.  I sketched up a square table per her request. The table would be 42” wide, 42” long and 18 ¾” tall.  (the sketch originally had a 15” leg but it did not suit her).  I attempted to use stock wood for all the components to keep it simple, on time and on budget. 
Accordingly, determine how large your sheet of glass needs to be. You won't cut the two short edges of the glass (the less you cut the glass the less likely you are to shatter it, so limit your cuts to the two curved edges). Since you don't cut the two short edges (i.e. the edges that will align with the square ends of your table), you immediately know how LONG the glass needs to be. Next figure out how wide the glass needs to be. You want there to be enough overlap for the profile you're going to cut so that you have some room to work with. Since you'll be using the off-cut glass later as a template for your routing, it's important to make sure that there will be a reasonable amount left.
Again, this should sound familiar. Our micro-generation is sometimes called the “Ikea generation,” in part because we’re the first to graduate from college and turn so forcefully toward a single provider of furniture. This finding is borne out in a totally nonscientific survey I conducted, of 770 people of various ages, socioeconomic backgrounds, and locations. Hundreds said that their first furniture was some combination of Ikea and something else. A 24-year-old from Washington, DC, who identifies their gender as nonbinary, said, “Everyone I know in their 20s is an Ikea addict.”

Make your dining room a bit more modern with this streamlined side chair. Founded atop four slightly tapered round legs, its frame is crafted from metal to support up to 250 lbs. Neutral faux leather upholstery envelops its tall curved back and seat, offering a budget-friendly and easy-to-clean alternative to genuine leather, while horizontal tufts stretch across the design to highlight its clean lines. Thanks to its narrow 38.5'' H x 16.5'' W x 19.75'' D silhouette, this piece is well-suited...
More than just stylish, this set also includes four stools that can be pulled out to accommodate extra guests, then tucked under the table when no longer needed. Try placing this set in your living room, then top it with a small bouquet of red roses, a stack of glossy art books, and a pair of white candles to craft a traditional vignette. Want to take the look further? Pair this set with a blue and white Persian-inspired rug, a brown leather Chesterfield sofa, and a couple of white arm chairs...
There’s a couch that’s in the backdrop of so many of my childhood photos, and if I concentrate, I can feel its texture: a bushy velvet, soft and pliant. Slate blue with white leafy fronds. It was passed down to my parents in the early ’80s, when they were living in Minneapolis, from my grandparents, who’d had it in their basement — purchased sometime in the 1950s.
Marble is stunning! Because it hearkens back to Greek statues and Roman emperors, it’s a great choice to add drama or classic beauty to a room. It is not, however, a great choice if you need something that’s heavy duty. While marble tables come in a wide variety of sizes, shapes, colors, and finished edges, it scratches and etches easily and is one of the most high-maintenance options for a table top.
After a marathon drive, Ms. Fabens and her husband, Andrew, had just arrived with another couple for a long fall weekend. Ms. Fabens had intended to scout the house for hazards, knickknacks and valuables. In an older woman’s parlor, it can be hard to tell the difference. But within 20 minutes of racing through the front door, Peter ran into the living room, tripped and caught the table. In his mouth.
Whether keeping TV remotes and drink coasters at arm’s reach or providing a place to pour tea when casually catching up with close friends, coffee tables are essential in any living room look. Bring contemporary appeal to your abode with this one that's as much an art piece as it is functional. Founded atop a mid-century inspired metal base, it showcases a sleek tempered and frosted glass tabletop for a trendsetting look.
Trying to decide between keeping a space cool and well-lit? With a ceiling fan like this, there's no need to choose! Perfect for a modern look in any ensemble, this piece features two fan blades crafted from clear acrylic glass that feature a curving design. For an added bright touch, this piece includes an integrated LED behind a frosted glass shade. Designed to keep larger spaces cool, this piece features six speeds, and includes a remote control.
The wood was sourced locally, cut, routed for the glass inset, sanded, and finished. The hairpin legs were cut, bent, and welded to brackets mounted underneath the tabletop. You can purchase hairpin legs (online, at local woodworking shops, etc) instead, but we wanted to make everything from scratch. Finally, the glass sheet was purchased, cut, shattered, purchased a second time, cut successfully, and fit into place. That's it!
I love this coffee pot. The coffee is so much better than what I get from my electric drip pot. I can make it really strong without bitterness or oiliness. Delicious! I would, however, skip the little $10.00 lid which I bought. The coffee really needs to be put into a thermal carafe right away to stay hot so the lid turns out to be completely useless. Great pot, forget the lid.
I was born in 1981, which places me on the far end of what marketers call “old millennials” — and particularly poised to observe just how effectively the furniture revolution has transformed my life and the lives of other (middle-class) millennials. I graduated from college in 2003 and spent the next decade moving all over the place: Over my graduate career and following attempts to secure a job, I moved to Seattle, Oregon, Texas, Vermont, and back to eastern Washington state before ending up in New York. https://www.crateandbarrel.com
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