If you have a large comfy sectional or the traditional conversational set up with a sofa and a couple of chairs (kind of like Ginny’s living room above), a square table is a great choice. It fits perfectly in the L-shape nook of your sectional or the big space in the middle of your chat zone. The best part of a square table? You get the most styling space bang for you buck. Who doesn’t love a good styled coffee table vignette? If you’re really into the terrazzo trend that popped up late last year, check out #9 from West Elm. We also really like the mix of the square top and round base of table #1 for a play on shapes. Similar to the shadow box table we talked about in the previous section, #2 from IKEA has a draw with four sections, and the glass top lets you see all the pretty things you decide to store (definitely not the best option if you know you’ll just end up junking up that drawer with remotes and catalogs, though). 

Bold yet versatile, this mid-century chair rounds out a dining table arrangement or acts as a spare seat in the living room. It stands atop four tapered legs – the back two of which are splayed – and features dramatically curved arms for a look that’s sure to grab glances. The poplar frame is wrapped in cotton upholstery, and foam fill in the cushion encourages you and your guests to kick back to enjoy your latest home-cooked meal.
The modern steamless espresso machine was invented in Milan, Italy, in 1938 by Achille Gaggia,[195] and from there spread in coffeehouses and restaurants across Italy and the rest of Europe in the early 1950s. An Italian named Pino Riservato opened the first espresso bar, the Moka Bar, in Soho in 1952, and there were 400 such bars in London alone by 1956. Cappucino was particularly popular among English drinkers.[196] Similarly in the United States, the espresso craze spread. North Beach in San Francisco saw the opening of the Caffe Trieste in 1957, which served Beat Generation poets such as Allen Ginsberg and Bob Kaufman alongside Italian immigrants.[196] Similar such cafes existed in Greenwich Village and elsewhere.[196]
Depending on the color of the roasted beans as perceived by the human eye, they will be labeled as light, medium light, medium, medium dark, dark, or very dark. A more accurate method of discerning the degree of roast involves measuring the reflected light from roasted seeds illuminated with a light source in the near-infrared spectrum. This elaborate light meter uses a process known as spectroscopy to return a number that consistently indicates the roasted coffee's relative degree of roast or flavor development.
Espresso-based coffee has a variety of possible presentations. In its most basic form, an espresso is served alone as a shot or short black, or with hot water added, when it is known as Caffè Americano. A long black is made by pouring a double espresso into an equal portion of water, retaining the crema, unlike Caffè Americano.[113] Milk is added in various forms to an espresso: steamed milk makes a caffè latte,[114] equal parts steamed milk and milk froth make a cappuccino,[113] and a dollop of hot foamed milk on top creates a caffè macchiato.[115] A flat white is prepared by adding steamed hot milk (microfoam) to espresso so that the flavour is brought out and the texture is unusually velvety.[116][117] It has less milk than a latte but both are varieties of coffee to which the milk can be added in such a way as to create a decorative surface pattern. Such effects are known as latte art.
Perfect for the host or hostess who’s short on square footage, this coffee table set includes one larger table and one smaller table that provide space to spread out snacks or set down cocktails when you have company. Once guests are gone, just tuck the smaller piece under its companion to reclaim your floor space. Crafted with a steel frame in a powder-coated gold finish, each design features a circular tempered glass top that supports up to 30 lbs. Assembly is required.
Undeniably the most common shape for any kind of table, you can’t go wrong with four sides and four corners! Rectangular tables are often better fits for long, narrow places and in fact, can make themselves smaller than round tables and yet still cover a lot of ground. Whether you’re hosting a holiday meal for a crowd or fitting a work table into an unused closet, rectangles can fit the bill perfectly. www.structube.com
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