This Juliette Glass Top Coffee Table will slay the design game. With an airy silhouette, the brass-finished frame is a ~work of art~ with its geometric cut outs and minimalist vibe. Stack your fave coffee table books and cutesy décor for an OTT look that will have you raking in the “Likes”. Juliette’s modern design and artistic side panels will upgrade your space to help you adult in style. 

Whether your space is classic or contemporary, dry or damp, large or small, this versatile wall mirror is perfect for them all! Proudly made in the USA, this piece is crafted with a manufactured wood frame glass center face that offers a glimpse of your reflection in any room. Since installation cleat hardware is included, this rectangular design is ready to hang vertically or horizontally as soon as it reaches your door.
When considering furniture as a centerpiece, it’s important to remember style, size, and color. Combine only two of these elements because you don’t want to overwhelm. If a glass coffee table is meant to be your centerpiece, make sure there’s something strong and noticeably different about it. The translucence of a glass coffee table means that it won’t take up any visual space. If it’s the right choice, your coffee table will draw attention for its uniqueness.
I thought I was being original, but I was incredibly typical. Millennial “style,” according to one expert, is “all about the mix — new and old, expensive and cheap, DIY and purchased.” “Authentic” in the form of repurposed wood and industrial aesthetic, “modern” with a piece of, uh, mid-century modern, and “individual” with a statement piece: a “Pinterest-worthy green velvet sofa,” as one survey respondent put it.
If the way we feel about furniture is, in fact, an extension of the way we feel about life, what does it say that so many millennials care more about the idea of something lasting rather than its actual capacity to do so, and the way it signals adulthood, rather than actually inhabits it? That’s what they’ve always said about millennials: We’re not adults; we’re simulacrums of adults, embracing the surface ideas (“adulting!”) without the substance (sacrifice, hard work).
“A lot of what is in our homes seems very temporary — like, this piece will do for now, until I have money/a place to live for more than a year/find something better,” one 27-year-old woman from Chicago said. “I think a lot of us do want heavy, well-made objects with history, but it just doesn't quite line up with budget and life stage. Stuff kind of weighs you down, too, and that's something I think a lot of young people are looking to avoid.”
Furniture during the Middle Ages is not as well known as that of earlier or later periods, and most sources show the types used by the nobility. In the Eastern Roman Empire, tables were made of metal or wood, usually with four feet and frequently linked by x-shaped stretchers. Tables for eating were large and often round or semicircular. A combination of a small round table and a lectern seemed very popular as a writing table.[4] In western Europe, the invasions and internecine wars caused most of the knowledge inherited from the classical era to be lost. As a result of the necessary movability, most tables were simple trestle tables, although small round tables made from joinery reappeared during the 15th century and onward. In the Gothic era, the chest became widespread and was often used as a table.

Simple and classy, the Creative Images International Coffee Table will elevate the beauty of your décor manifold. With bold curves and a posh finesse, this table offers a lot of purpose to your living space. The immaculate cuts and shiny finish of the table makes it a great fit in any interior. This charming coffee table is engineered entirely out of bent glass for added durability and strength. It stands on two legs and has a sled type base for extra firmness on the ground. Place it at the...


First up: rules. While you can, of course, go with whatever shape and size you like, to have an ideal relationship between your coffee table and sofa, here are some general things to keep in mind: Your coffee table should be at least half the length of your sofa (but no more than roughly ⅔ the length) and should sit at about the same height as the seat, give or take 4 inches (i.e., if your sofa is 90-inches long and 20-inches tall, you should look for something, no matter the shape, that’s around 45 to 54 inches wide and 16 to 24 inches tall). However, if you have a sectional with a chaise, and your table is going within the open L-shape that sofa shape creates, that 1/2 to 2/3 guideline applies better to just the length of the horizontal seat, rather than the full length of the sofa. Here’s a quick graphic to show you what we mean, as well as a breakdown of ideal shapes by sofa configuration:

Lastly, before shopping for your perfect coffee table, pick a few materials that would work well with your lifestyle and your space. Don't just default to wood—there are so many options out there. Now that glass is out of the question for families with small children, think of other options that could work well for your lifestyle. If you have a small space, a lucite coffee table could be a good option to not visually clutter the room. If you have hardwood floors in a mid-tone color, try staying away from wood—and pick something complementary like marble or travertine.
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