Another reason we don’t care (as much) about our furniture: Our taste is different than our parents. We tilt towards mid-century modern — an aesthetic many of our parents still conceive of as the furniture style of their parents. But we also care less about things like “furniture sets” — i.e., buying large groups of furniture that match, are meant to be kept in one room, and cost thousands of dollars. That’s the kind of stuff that’s made of real wood, and is bought on payment plans at old-school furniture stores you’ve probably never set foot in.
Loo tables were very popular in the 18th and 19th centuries as candlestands, tea tables, or small dining tables, although they were originally made for the popular card game called loo or lanterloo. Their typically round or oval tops have a tilting mechanism, which enables them to be stored out of the way (e.g. in room corners) when not in use. A further development in this direction was the "birdcage" table, the top of which could both revolve and tilt.
This step can be easy, or less easy; it all depends on your comfort with a welder and/or desire to make everything by hand. If you don't want to weld the legs yourself, there are plenty of pre-fabricated versions available online, some not much more expensive than it would cost to make them yourself! As I enjoy welding, we decided to make the table legs from scratch.
Tables come in a wide variety of materials, shapes, and heights dependent upon their origin, style, intended use and cost. Many tables are made of wood or wood-based products; some are made of other materials including metal and glass. Most tables are composed of a flat surface and one or more supports (legs). A table with a single, central foot is a pedestal table. Long tables often have extra legs for support.

This one is similar to mid-century modern in that it utilizes clean lines and veers toward minimalism, however, true Scandinavian style makes use of white and light colors and rarely uses carpet or especially plush textiles, favoring clean, light-colored wood floors in shades of white or grey. White walls are ubiquitous, though some Scandinavian designers will utilize very modern, geometric color patterns in bedding, curtains, or wall art.
Yes. The most common size hole for an umbrella table is 2 1/2" at the center, though you’ll need to let us know the exact size you’ll need when you place your order. If the size of the hole you need is different from one of the standard sizes we offer listed below, or in a location other than the center of the table, you’ll need to provide the diameter along with the location in an email or drawing. The cost may be higher for a customized hole. Please keep in mind that we do not offer the plastic cover that goes with such a hole. If you want more than one hole drilled into the same piece of glass, we’ll need to follow specific tempering guidelines.
You could also opt for a reflective finish – be it mirrored glass, polished wood veneer or a metallic sheen – as this will encourage the light to bounce around and exaggerate the feeling of space within the room. Total winner. Plus, you can decorate your coffee table with lots of lovelies – fresh flowers, grouped accessories, coffee table books, deliciously scented candles – and put your drinks down. Result!
Fan out a stack of glossy magazines or just keep a tray of cocktails out for your guests with this sleek coffee table. Taking on a clean-lined silhouette that works well in both classic and contemporary settings, its frame is crafted from steel while the top is tempered glass. Though understated in its design, this piece lends a pop of polish to any living room look or den ensemble with its metallic finishes. https://www.walmart.com
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