The word coffee appears to have derived from the name of the region where coffee beans were first used by a herder in the 6th or 9th century (depending on author): kaffa (from the Keffa Zone in southwestern Ethiopia) derived from Kaffa Province, which was the name of the region in ancient Abyssinia.[11][12] The word "coffee" entered the English language in 1582 via the Dutch koffie, borrowed from the Ottoman Turkish kahve, borrowed in turn from the Arabic qahwah.[13] The Arabic word qahwah was traditionally held to refer to a type of wine whose etymology is given by Arab lexicographers as deriving from the verb qahiya, "to lack hunger", in reference to the drink's reputation as an appetite suppressant. It has also been proposed that the source may be the Proto-Central Semitic root q-h-h meaning "dark".[14]
The espresso method forces hot pressurized and vaporized water through ground coffee. As a result of brewing under high pressure (ideally between 9–10 atm), the espresso beverage is more concentrated (as much as 10 to 15 times the quantity of coffee to water as gravity-brewing methods can produce) and has a more complex physical and chemical constitution.[109] A well-prepared espresso has a reddish-brown foam called crema that floats on the surface.[104] Other pressurized water methods include the moka pot and vacuum coffee maker. 

^ "Stoughton, WI – Where the Coffee Break Originated". www.stoughtonwi.com. Stoughton, Wisconsin Chamber of Commerce. Archived from the original on May 20, 2009. Retrieved June 11, 2009. Mr. Osmund Gunderson decided to ask the Norwegian wives, who lived just up the hill from his warehouse, if they would come and help him sort the tobacco. The women agreed, as long as they could have a break in the morning and another in the afternoon, to go home and tend to their chores. Of course, this also meant they were free to have a cup of coffee from the pot that was always hot on the stove. Mr. Gunderson agreed and with this simple habit, the coffee break was born.

When more courses are being served, place settings may become more elaborate and cutlery more specialised. Examples include fruit spoon or fruit knife, cheese knife, and pastry fork. Other types of cutlery, such as boning forks, were used when formal meals included dishes that have since become less common. Carving knives and forks are used to carve roasts at the table.
Matching furniture, massive sectional sofas, bedrooms sets, the sort of things you put in a house, likely in the suburbs, that you own and from which you won’t move — for boomers, those are the signifiers of becoming an adult, of making it. Younger people, by contrast, mark adulthood with the purchase of an expensive piece — and the accumulation of more durable items, if not necessarily more expensive, that better represent their individual taste.
Today, Hammary offers a variety of styles in living room tables, chairside tables, home office furniture, home entertainment furnishings and wide range of accent furniture from the Hidden Treasures collection. Living room table groups feature an assortment of items such as rectangular coffee tables, square coffee tables, and oval coffee tables, end and side tables, lamp tables and sofa tables in a choice of wood or glass tops. In addition to wood tables, Hammary Furniture also carries metal tables in styled in wrought iron, cast iron or cast aluminum with wood, glass, or stone tops.

^ Other historians accredit the conception of the Coffee Break to John Catrone, an electrician, who coined the phrase while working in Revere, Massachusetts in the 1950s. Hunt, Morton M. (1993). The story of psychology (1st ed.). New York: Doubleday. p. 260. ISBN 978-0-385-24762-7. [work] for Maxwell House that helped make the 'coffee break' an American custom in offices, factories, and homes.
Coffee drinking was prohibited by jurists and scholars (ulema) meeting in Mecca in 1511 as haraam, but the subject of whether it was intoxicating was hotly debated over the next 30 years until the ban was finally overturned in the mid-16th century.[209] Use in religious rites among the Sufi branch of Islam led to coffee's being put on trial in Mecca: it was accused of being a heretical substance, and its production and consumption were briefly repressed. It was later prohibited in Ottoman Turkey under an edict by the Sultan Murad IV.[210]
Coffee competitions take place across the globe with people at the regional competing to achieve national titles and then compete on the international stage. World Coffee Events holds the largest of such events moving the location of the final competition each year. The competition includes the following events: Barista Championship, Brewers Cup, Latte Art and Cup Tasters. A World Brewer's Cup Championship takes place in Melbourne, Australia, every year that houses contestants from around the world[228] to crown the World's Coffee King.[229][230] https://www.allmodern.com
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